‘Territorial Hues’ offers colorful journey through Washington State’s printmaking past

Originally published October 16, 2017 at 6:00 am by Michael Upchurch, Special to the Seattle Times Over the last 25 years, Seattle curator David F. Martin has been on a search-and-rescue mission, uncovering lost chapters in the history of Pacific Northwest Art. He has placed shows by such remarkable figures

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Cascadia Art Museum exhibit displays color prints

Article from The Edmonds Beacon, October 6, 2017 Cascadia Art Museum’s new exhibit, “Territorial Hues: The Color Print and Washington State, 1920-1960,” opened Oct. 5 and continues through Jan. 7. The exhibition and catalog is the first study of color printmaking in Washington state during the period 1920-1960. It consists

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A book and museum uncover ‘virtually hidden’ Northwest color

Cascadia Art Museum curator David Martin’s book “Territorial Hues” catalogs prints from 1920 to 1960. By Gale Fiege of the Everett Herald, Thursday, October 5, 2017 5:35 am EDMONDS — I remember my shock as a kid in the 1970s when I figured out that most people in New York

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Cascadia Art Museum exhibit features Paul Morgan Gustin’s works

Gale Fiege of the Everett Herald, Fri Jul 14th, 2017 9:08am EDMONDS — Cascadia Art Museum curator David Martin knows his stuff. If you appreciate Northwest regional art from the first half of the 20th century and you ever have a chance to tour the museum with Martin, don’t hesitate.

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Potter working a piece of clay

Dolphins have a streamlined fusiform body, adapted for fast swimming. The tail fin, called the fluke, is used for propulsion while the pectoral fins, together with the entire tail section, provide directional control. The dorsal fin, in those species that have one, provides stability while swimming. Though varying by species,

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Adventures of the realistic Africa

Dolphins have a streamlined fusiform body, adapted for fast swimming. The tail fin, called the fluke, is used for propulsion while the pectoral fins, together with the entire tail section, provide directional control. The dorsal fin, in those species that have one, provides stability while swimming. Though varying by species,

Continue reading